Syndicate Like QBASIC Game Is On GreenLight

Black Annex

In what is being hailed as a first by many, Steam now has a QBASIC game in its Greenlight public voting platform and impressively it looks quite good.

Featuring gameplay that looks clearly inspired by the cult espionage favorite, Syndicate, the art style is more likely to draw your eye, as it's incredibly 'basic' - but surprisingly charming. Players control a team of individuals that must complete missions within a corporate office environment, hacking through doors, stealing business secrets and gunning down enemies should they appear or if a random office working needs subduing.

Called Black Annex, this is the first game from Man Fight Dragon and it's already got a lot of heat on Steam and in international press for its impressive aims as much as for its ancient codebase. To put it into perspective, QBASIC was developed and released around 1991.

The feature list for the game is as follows:

  • An isometric action-fest with a twist of deception and espionage!
  • A huge array of missions spanning multiple corporate locations!
  • Collect enemy agents during missions to add to your team!
  • Discover hidden, unique agents by completing optional tasks!
  • Explore "Black Annex" with your persona agent and keep business running smoothly!
  • Upgrade weapon and deception abilities over time to further breach target corporations!
  • "Rebuild" completed missions indefinitely until you've collected all the agents and assets!

Black Annex is set for release towards the end of 2013. If you want to vote on its Greenlight page then go here.

The new trailer also looks great:

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Comments

More verbal dueling!

Yessssh! Throw aboard decency and basic social etiquette! Slander each other, join the dark side! Setting a great example, outstanding. Back to the topic at hand, regardless of coding language used, this game looks awesome! Here is hoping they were able to get a bit of the old school Syndicate feeling in the game.

I have to agree here. QBasic

I have to agree here. QBasic doesn't have the support that many "modern" languages have. Look at what is supported as far as commercial compilers goes, QBasic is not listed. It also does not have access to great libraries that make game dev, or software dev for that matter easier and quicker. As to the poster that disagrees, they probably aren't a software developer since not all compiled code is created equally. Learn about compilers and then come to your own conclusion.

Die in a Fire

What languages do you program your games in? I'm guessing you don't write software, or if you do, you're bad at it, because otherwise you'd know that once compiled, it doesn't fucking matter. Syndicate was a great game, but like most large game companies today, EA shat out a "remake" that, instead of focusing on what made the game enjoyable (strategy), just tried to copy what made the game cool (gun-toting cyborgs in trench coats), then, baked it in the FPS oven at 350. All so they could sell it to 12 year old morons like the OP (and various other console kiddies.) And shocker! It didn't sell! And now, EA scratches its head and asks, "what happened?" Answer: because most of us are not idiots. (OP excepted.) I'll take this qbasic game over EAs garbage anyday.

claritin clear challenge

Sounds like you are the moron, cause it does fucking matter which coding language is used. A serious coder would know the differences big time, but you are such a scrub talking big you have no clue. As a hobbyist, and non full time programmer I can understand trying to make something from Qbasic, but a professional would never do it.

Die in a fire

Uh, ok, and how would you know since you just said you aren't one? If you had any clue, you'd know there is exactly one person developing this game, and from what it sounds like, it's also HIS hobby. This is not some AAA title asshole. As for me, I don't care if you think I'm a serious coder or not. I've got seven fortune 500 companies using my shit. I get paid, so I only care that they are happy. What do you have other than a light snack when you get home from school? So show me something smart man. Explain to me why a small game of clearly limited scope and ridiculously low system requirements needs a more sophisticated development platform...especially for a single developer? What would you suggest? Write this down, because it might help you in the future: the best tool for the job is, first, one that is suitable (it is, since he has made a game with it), second, one that the user is most comfortable and experienced with (in this case, QB seems to fit the bill), and last, whatever your worthless opinion is. Now underline this: "Go fuck yourself, rectally, with a broken beer bottle." Or go make a better version, since apparently you know how it's supposed to be done.

OP here

I made the original post and haven't replied util now, but allow me to clarify some things that you seem to be unaware of. I'll quote you and reply 1. "Explain to me why a small game of clearly limited scope and ridiculously low system requirements needs a more sophisticated development platform...especially for a single developer?" - That's quite simple and you answered it yourself, it's being made by a single developer. A "more sophisticated development platform" offers many shortcuts, code completion, code formatting, error detection, improved debugging tools and a plethora of other features that make it so much easier for a single man to work on his projects. 2. "the best tool for the job is, first, one that is suitable (it is, since he has made a game with it)" While you are right about picking the right tool for the job (It's the right thing to do) I could not think of a worst reason to say a tool is suitable for a job just because it can get the job done, like my old software engineering teacher used to say in college "you can dig a hole with a pen, but that doesnt mean you should use a pen for the job", you really need more education on the subject. 3. "second, one that the user is most comfortable and experienced with (in this case, QB seems to fit the bill)" I'll let this one slide because the guy did it as a hobby, when it comes to professional development though, number 2 takes priority and its up to the developer to learn, adapt and improve himself. 4. " As for me, I don't care if you think I'm a serious coder or not. I've got seven fortune 500 companies using my shit" I saved the best for last of course, first, from the way you talk (read number 2 if you missed it) you make very basic mistakes, you are not a good coder. Second, fortune 500 companies using "your shit" means nothing (assuming you even made any "shit" that can be used which, judging by the way you talk, I doubt it), they use old dirty mops to wipe their floors clean and that could be the case for "your shit". Just some shitty product they use because its irrelevant to spend big money on the task its meant to complete.

know your rights

Clearly you didn't understand my point I was trying to point out. I am a hobbyist as of right now, but I was a professional programmer at two game developers companies a couple years back. Do I know something about language support, and which ones are better suited for game development? I think I do. It comes down to which company you work for, and what back end engine support you have. Not to mention what your team is supposed to be doing. Would I code in Qbasic if I was a lone coder doing a indie title? fucking hell no. I find the idea to be very un efficient to use old primitive language that you honestly can't do a whole lot with. If the guy ever makes a sequel I highly doubt he would use Qbasic again... especially since it hasn't been highly used for over a decade. so do me a favor tough guy why don't you fall down some stairs with a glass bottle in your ass.

Damn, did he hit a nerve or

Damn, did he hit a nerve or something? Calm down. But, I agree with you - it's just like that guy commenting on the Garriot post a couple of weeks back who said 'real' game developers shouldn't use game engines because they'll 'lose a lot of extremely important knowledge' (I know, right? That's what college is for. In the real world, we have goals, and deadlines, and use whatever tools we need to get the job done properly). 'Real' developers don't care about what platform, language or text editor you use (anyone who spends any time arguing with people over what IDE they use should be fired immediately because they're going to be terrible at their job) - they just get it done in the best way they can, regardless of what anyone else is saying or doing. Hell, my brother develops mobile apps for huge music labels using mostly common LISP because he gets things done faster and better in it. How many of his clients care? Zero.

QBasic was the starting

QBasic was the starting language for many game developers... The QBasic scene back in the '80 and '90 was huge and some people did awesome stuff with such 'limited' (for today's substandard programmers) language.

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