Read an e-book, go to jail?

The example I am about to show you is quite atrocious. The posting points out the fine print in the licensing of Adobe's new e-book product Glassbook, a snapshot of which you will find below. Glassbook has taken a number of literary classics in the public domain and digitized them. They then put these restrictions on what they deem fair use. It is almost comical if not surreal:

Copy:
No text selections can be copied from the book to the clipboard.
Print:
No printing is permitted on this book.
Lend:
This book cannot be lent or given to someone else.
Give:
This book cannot be given to someone else.
Read Aloud:
This book cannot be read aloud.

According to Adobe, if you read Alice in Wonderland from their e-book to your son or daughter, you have violated their copyright. If you use shareware to copy a passage of it for your kids book report, you have committed a criminal act as now defined by the US Copyright Office.

Remember the student in Oklahoma whose dorm room was raided because he downloaded music from Napster? (see Oklahoma Student to be Sacrificial Lamb in MP3 Wars). He just recently plead guilty to a misdemeanor in that case so he wouldn't drive his family bankrupt in legal fees. In an effort to exert their self-proclaimed rights, oligopolies and self-interest groups like the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) look for individuals to be their "examples". People they ruin to scare off others and dictate their vision of right and wrong. A vision solely driven by the singular goal of increasing profit.

Want to hear the ultimate irony? Adobe pulled the transcription of Alice in Wonderland from Project Gutenberg, a library of electronically stored books, mostly classics that can be downloaded for free and viewed off-line. The goal is to make these books free and accessible to all people, specifically those who have limited access to these works. Adobe downloaded the books for free, repackaged it, and are stripping away the open permissions that Project Gutenberg already endowed upon you. The right to freely read and pass on fine literature because it will better the world.

See what we mean by self-proclaimed copyrights? Take what's in the public domain, plant a flag on it like it was the Oklahoma land rush, claim ownership for your company, make up your own restrictions, and take people to court if they don't pay up. This is what the implications of the US Copyright Office's recent decision have brought upon us.

Our advice? Start by doing the worst thing you can do to Adobe's new e-book - don't buy it. Then go to Project Gutenberg's site and download a few stories.

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Read an e-book, go to jail?

Now you guys are just f**king retarded. The book can OBVIOUSLY be read aloud. It's Alice in Wonderland, and as another poster noted, it's Public Domain. Shit, you could read it aloud on national TV, if you were really that bored. Secondly, Project Gutenberg is the organization that wrote this, not Adobe. Adobe just made the reader program, Project Gutenberg put together the text warnings. And the only reason they did that is to protect themselves from the slight chance that someone out there might target THEM for a lawsuit. And how are you gonna boycott Adobe? They make the best graphics software in the world. Napster Sold Out.

Read an e-book, go to jail?

Let me get this straight, reading one of Adobe's e-books outloud is a violation of copyright law? If you bought an "old-fashioned" book, you could read that outloud. Adobe is not only trying to take away our freedom to distribute books electronically, but they're trying to stop us from communicating these books in any way. Doesn't that infringe on our rights of free speech? How can some huge corporation have the balls to say that American copyright law is valid on electronically while the American Bill of Rights is not?

Read an e-book, go to jail?

Reading is bad?...All those wasted years in school, what was I thinking, oh yeah it just came back to me...Reading feeds the mind and who cares if a "free" book is read aloud? I mean come on, settle down and let the few people left who enjoy reading read the books however they want.Whats next, no more reading on the crapper?

Read an e-book, go to jail?

Just like Pentium chips with the built-in cookie inside and expensive music CDs,savotage all that stuff by NOT BUYING THEM.That's how simple it is to savotage those kinds of companies and people who come up with that kind of crap.Those who argue that Napster is "stealing" are the same that say that reading a book aloud is a crime, they don't deserve any respect whatsoever.

Read an e-book, go to jail?

*BEFORE!* YOU USE OR READ THIS ETEXTBy using or reading any part of this PROJECT GUTENBERG-tmetext, you indicate that you understand, agree to and acceptthis "Small Print!" statement. If you do not, you can receivea refund of the money (if any) you paid for this etext bysending a request within 30 days of receiving it to the personyou got it from. If you received this etext on a physicalmedium (such as a disk), you must return it with your request.ABOUT PROJECT GUTENBERG-TM ETEXTSThis PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etext, like most PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etexts, is a "public domain" work distributed by ProfessorMichael S. Hart through the Project Gutenberg Association atIllinois Benedictine College (the "Project"). Among otherthings, this means that no one owns a United States copyrighton or for this work, so the Project (and you!) can copy anddistribute it in the United States without permission andwithout paying copyright royalties. Special rules, set forthbelow, apply if you wish to copy and distribute this etextunder the Project's "PROJECT GUTENBERG" trademark.To create these etexts, the Project expends considerableefforts to identify, transcribe and proofread public domainworks. Despite these efforts, the Project's etexts and anymedium they may be on may contain "Defects". Among otherthings, Defects may take the form of incomplete, inaccurate orcorrupt data, transcription errors, a copyright or otherintellectual property infringement, a defective or damageddisk or other etext medium, a computer virus, or computercodes that damage or cannot be read by your equipment.LIMTED WARRANTY; DISCLAIMER OF DAMAGESBut for the "Right of Replacement or Refund" described below,[1] the Project (and any other party you may receive thisetext from as a PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etext) disclaims allliability to you for damages, costs and expenses, includ

Read an e-book, go to jail?

Hehe, I think ermac61 puts it plainly, entropy has a point though, why should they have the right to stop us speaking out loud? To be honest, I though that e-books were the next best thing to face the world. It looks like all of the companies are stretching the copyrights to no avail to anybody but themselves. Its plain GREED! I hope a company uses the e-book more flexibly for the sake of mankind.

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